Archives for posts with tag: recruiting

I’ll be one of the first to admit it, searching for a new job is not an enjoyable process.  Not only do I know this from speaking with people on a daily basis about it, but I have also had my fair share of visits to indeed.com the past year and a half as well (3 jobs in Nashville since March 2010).  The good news about my expertise in hiring and firing is that hopefully I can help shine some new light on your search through some simple ABC’s – Attitude, Blogging, and Checking in.

Let’s face it, searching for a job, when done properly is a full time job in and of itself.  Constant emails, applications, meetings,  coffees, phone calls, and networking events.  It seems like a never ending circle which often times produces little to no results.  True, the results aren’t always immediate and can be somewhat disheartening.  We find an ad that looks like a great match and come to find out the position is already filled.  Back to the drawing board!  These feel like little failures, but being without a job already puts us down and then it just feels like you are being kicked while you are down.

Norman Vincent Peale once said “life for most of us contains many tough and difficult problems; we need all the confidence and reassurance we can get.  Nothing builds confidence and reassurance like a word of praise.  Nothing restores our self-esteem and recharges our batteries like a little admiration.”  When we are in our work environment, we have others who are in the trenches with us.  We can reach out to them, they can encourage us.  When we are out on our own in job search town, who do we have?  Few cheerleaders helping us along the way.

Attitude plays an extremely vital role in ones job search.  For people in sales, rejection is common, but it can still sting when going on that second month without a job.  The secret is the daily habits that we form.  The more you treat your job search like you did when punching the clock,  the more you will be able to stay focused and maintain a positive mental attitude.  Believe me, it comes across in all that you do and people notice it.

One way to help stay on track is to write a blog.  You may or may not already do this and you may or may not have any clue on how to get started.  The great thing is that it doesn’t even matter because you can change it up as you go.  I put off writing this blog for months until a few weeks ago I decided to just jump right in.  I hope the content is improving week by week, but who knows!  The point is, I am here showing my expertise and sharing my knowledge about job searching, career tips, recruiting, hiring, etc.  Writing a blog will help in showing you are an expert in your given field, build your online presence and show that you aren’t just sitting on your hands all day.  If you are still trying to get over the hurdle of writing or not, just remember that action cures fear.  Set it up and go for it!  Even if it is just strings of ideas, that is better than nothing and at least you are getting started.

Speaking of online presence, I won’t go into many details in this post, but if you haven’t started to build your online presence yet and you are looking for a new opportunity then you should skip the blog and go straight to LinkedIn.com and create a profile.  Right now.  Seriously, stop reading this and go create it!

OK, now that you have your shiny LinkedIn profile, your blog, and your great attitude, you actually get a job interview.  What do you do?  You’ve been in a slump and then out of nowhere you feel saved!  First of all, it’s not out of nowhere.  You have been putting in countless hours and things are starting to pay off!  So you get an interview, you prepare and do everything you are supposed to.  You feel like it goes well and you get home and are certain you are going to be the one they hire.  Write a thank you note to every person you met and let them know you appreciate their time and enjoyed learning about their great company.  Then what?  The waiting game begins, that’s what.

I am often asked, “Adam, how long should I wait to follow up or check in?  I really am interested in the job, but I don’t want to be pushy.  If I wait too long, maybe they won’t think I am interested.”  This can be a difficult situation, but it doesn’t really need to be.  As long as you remember to send an email after interviewing, that shows you are appreciative and do have at least some interest.  If you are working with a recruiter, they will let you know as soon as they know, trust me.  Try to remember the more people involved in the interview, chances are the longer it will take.  If you just met with a hiring manger and maybe the team lead, they can discuss you and other candidates if in the mix and probably make a decision fairly quickly.  If it is a whole team and they will all have input and then they need to let the corporate recruiter know and then she needs to let your recruiter know, it’s going to take a little longer.  All that being said, checking in is still a great idea as long as you aren’t doing it morning, noon, and night.  After the initial email, give it 3-4 days so everyone has a chance to give feedback.  If by the 5th business day you still don’t have any feedback, checking with the recruiter is ok.  If this interview is independent of a recruiter, maybe a short email to the person you had the most contact with saying you just wanted to check in and let them know you are very interested in learning what the next steps will be.  It doesn’t need to be long and elaborate, just enough to give a subtle push to show you truly are interested and not just testing the waters or sending emails because that is what you are supposed to do.  Sometimes the hiring manager really is that busy and is just having a difficult time getting around to doing all of the necessary steps in order to extend an offer.  Just have a good attitude about it, write in your blog how great the company is and check back in again after another week or so and continue to do so until you are hired there or somewhere else!

What are your thoughts on this?  Do you have any questions?  Please let me know in the comments section below!  Thanks for reading!

Chances are, if you are reading this you have had to deal with a shoddy recruiter or 2. Or 3. Or more.  I hate to say it, but I am not surprised. It’s unfortunate, but there are so many horrible recruiters out there it is insane!  While I won’t be able to stop them from being horrible, I can try to help you avoid them from calling. And calling. And calling.

There are countless ways in which a recruiter can find your telephone number, but if they are the type that just dials for dollars,   they more than likely got your number from your resume being posted on a job board somewhere.  Don’t get me wrong, it is ok to put your number on your resume when you are searching.  In fact, you SHOULD put your number out there if you are searching, that is how someone will be able to reach out to you!  The problem is once you receive a job offer you may forget to take your resume down from the board or it may already be stored in a database.

When you are looking, if your resume is listed on a job board I am going to assume you aren’t hiding anything.  If that is the case, you may wish to change your voicemail message to end somewhere along the lines of:

“And if this is a recruiter, it is best to send me an email and I will follow up when I am able”

Choose your message how you deem fit, but the next step I would do is create a “job search” email address.  This will allow you to check emails when necessary and also allow you to keep track of different places you apply.  It should still be professional so you are able to use it when applying to specific companies as well as recruiters.  By setting your voicemail to have an email sent (to a job search address) you won’t have to worry about it cluttering up your inbox, but yet you will still be able to check it out when the time is right.

Even though you may continue to receive emails to your job search account even when you are no longer looking, I would still suggest checking it out every so often just in case your “dream job” pops up or there is a position which may line up with a colleagues skills that you know is looking.  It is a good idea to always know what else is out there as well as what fair market value is for someone in a similar position at another company.  Money isn’t everything, but it sure helps!

I realize this isn’t a foolproof method.  I also realize you may be bombarded with emails, but at least having a job search email address will allow you continue on with your daily life and only check it when you feel you are ready.  And please, as I mentioned before, keep it professional.  Nobody wants to call on somebody who has an email address like NinjaDonkey1975@aol.com.

Do you have any tips on avoiding recruiters?  Leave them in the comments section and help your fellow readers!

After the job report this morning, I think it is safe to say that if you are able to secure an interview with a company you better take full advantage of the situation.  In my world as a recruiter, I have come to expect the unexpected.  I really shouldn’t be surprised anymore by what I hear from interviews, but I do deal with people and well, people are unpredictable!

With that, I thought I would share with you a recent situation we encountered.  This candidate is interviewing for a higher level job, paying in the upper $100K range and would be working in a management capacity.  One would think to get to that level in your career you would have to have your head on straight and know what you are doing, as well as be able to read situations correctly and act accordingly.  One would think…

Describe your management style…


To which the candidate responded  – “My employees love me. I make sure they have cookies, and cake and happy hour and stuff like that all the time.”  (Granted, I am sure most of us would love that as well, it probably isn’t the best way to conduct yourself in an interview.)

There were other questions asking the candidate about situations and relating to the potential position, but there was also another where the potential employer asked the candidate to describe their dream job and to speak about their passion to which the candidate replied “I’d like to be a tour manager for a rock band.”  Again, I am sure the person was just being honest and that sounds like it could be a pretty fun job, but I doubt it was what the person giving the interview had in mind, especially coming from a person of such “high caliber.”
There were a couple other odd answers as well, but that is enough to help prove my point.  Even though the job market is slow in certain parts of the country and having the chance to interview doesn’t come nearly as often as you would like, it is one thing to be yourself, just keep it within reason.  You may feel this is your one and only shot to leave a lasting impression.  And it is.  You just want to make sure the impression you are leaving is a good one where you don’t come across as immature or crazy or any other negative feeling.

Do you know anyone with some “different” interview answers?  Leave them in the comments section below and share with the rest of us!

Matthew Norwood (@MatthewNorwood) brought this to my attention today during a conversation via Twitter.  If you are a recruiter, you should find some humor in this (and probably switch things up a bit) and if you have ever had a recruiter “reach out to you,” you know the gig all too well.
Anyway, thought it was pretty funny and definitely worth sharing!

Shout out to Ethan Banks (twitter.com/ecbanks) for taking the time to put them all together.

 http://packetpushers.net/top-10-it-recruiter-catchphrases-humor/